Types of Nail Fungus

Fungal infections are very common, affecting an estimated 11 million Americans. How do you know if you have a nail infection? Because nail fungal infections tend to develop gradually over time, it can be difficult at first to determine the presence of nail fungus. Once the infection has become well established, it is hard to miss the signs of nail fungus. Individuals with nail fungal infections tend to suffer from thick, yellowish nails that grow irregularly, often manifesting ridges or spots. The nails may also appear brown or black in color. So how do our nails become like this? Here is a brief overview of they most common types of nail fungus.

First, it helps to understand the nature of fungus. Fungus grows in any warm, dark and moist location. Fungus grows everywhere in our environment and on our skin. Nail fungal infections occur when fungi enters the nails and finds an environment that allows it to thrive and grow. People who are prone to developing nail fungal infections may have nails that are vulnerable in some way. For instance, people who work in moist or warm locations may be more vulnerable.

One of the most common forms of fungi is related to the fungus that causes athlete's foot. This fungus is known as tinea. The tinea fungus may be present in people who have athlete's foot. This fungus can grow around the skin and spread into the nails. Dermatologists estimate that roughly 30 percent of those affected with athlete's foot will also develop a nail infection.

Another common type of fungi that can cause serious infections is Candida. Candida is common yeast that can cause infections in skin around nails. Candida is known as a rather nasty type of fungus that can develop into a difficult to treat skin and nail infections. Yeast fungi are the most common types of fungi in the United States.

Yet another common type of fungi that is responsible for many nail fungal infections around the world is known as dermatophyte. This type of fungi literally means "plant that lives on the skin." Dermatophyte is fungi characterized by its small, parasitic-like properties. Dermatophyte fungi are most common in temperate areas of the world. The fungi work by digesting keratin (the protein that makes up our skin, hair, and nails), and this causes a trigger response in the nails to produce extra keratin. This causes the nails to thicken and eventually become discolored. When nails thicken due to infection, they may separate from the rest of the toe or finger. Dermatophyte fungi are also responsible for other common skin and nail infections, including some types of athlete's foot, ringworm and "crotch rot."

All types of fungi flourish in warm, dark and moist environments. To prevent fungi from multiplying beneath your nails, keep your feet and hands clean and dry. Avoid the warm, dark, wet and dirty conditions that fungi love to thrive in because once they settle in, it can be quite difficult to rid the skin and nails of fungi forever.

Nail fungus news on the Web




Agoura Hills Acorn
These patients provided the information needed for the FDA's approval to treat nail fungus with the laser. Some of these patients had tried to kill their ...




Siliconindia.com (blog)
I recommend a 240 grit for natural nails Nail fungus also occurs to people who have a weak immune system. Therefore, eating a healthy diet would help in ...




Herald & Review
Mycocide Nail Fungus Test Kit, over-the-counter: The first at-home screening kit to help you diagnose toenail/fingernail fungus, though most people see a ...




Earthtimes (press release)
NexMed is actively engaged in efforts to re-license this product for the treatment of nail fungus. In the meantime, Novartis continues to transfer the ...




Detroit Free Press
... physician Dr. James Baker, is developing a new type of compound from tiny particles to treat cold sores, nail fungus, acne and a few other diseases. ...




Crain's Detroit Business
... also makes emulsions to treat nail fungus, acne and cystic fibrosis and that serve as platforms for a wide variety of intranasal vaccines. ...
CNNMoney.com (press release)




Jerusalem Post
Litzman, said Adatto got approval for the health funds to subsidize "a cream for nail fungus when she was a member of the basket committee. ...




KFSM
... treated with special shoes and adhesive pads Yellow discolored and thickened toenails that may also have white marks are suffering from a nail fungus. ...




Crain's Detroit Business
... and Ann Arbor-based NanoBio Corp. closed on a $22 million round for its topical products to treat such conditions as nail fungus, cold sores and cystic ...




PR Web (press release)
... Media (middle-ear infection), Contact Lens Solution and Sinusitis (sinus infection) as well as NovaBay's internal Onychomycosis (nail fungus) program. ...


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